Wishlists

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Slam-Cut
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Joined: 09/07/2011

Was there a prize for being the 1500th post on this thread?
No? I thought I read about it somewhere...

Slam-Cut
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Joined: 09/07/2011

ElectricWombat: yeah I had the same thought about Sunrizer and the Novation Supernova. I seriously considered getting one about 5-6 years ago, but I ended up with the Roland Gaia instead. I do love me some Roland gear... It would be interesting to hear from someone with a Supernova & Sunrizer, just to see if they are in fact similar under the hood. I get a bit of a Supernova feeling with Sunrizer, but Sunrizer wasn't touted as an emulation, so my guess is that they sound significantly different.

Slam-Cut
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Post actually relating to thread topic:

On the FX page of the mixer it would be really nice to be able to simply long press an FX module and be able to slide it to another position on the FX chain, like moving app in iOS. The other FX modules could jiggle a bit too to let one know you are in 're-arrange mode', but that might be a bit too much of an homage to iOS. Could make us puke. Sliding positions of modules would still be very cool. Sorry if this has been suggested too many times already by others. I've just gotten around to thinking I could really make use of that feature sometimes.

syrupcore
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Joined: 09/26/2010

Slam cut, good news! you can do exactly that already. Doesn't require a very long press.

Slam-Cut
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Joined: 09/07/2011

Tried it before posting. I'll re-calibrate my fingers and try again.

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

Hey @Stiksi, thanks for your post you make some really good points and I can see how in terms of your own requirements/experience that the existing data available via the LCD is a useful/essential feature etc! I completely agree that having an additional display is great - but I just think it would be nice if it were more sophisticated non-the-less (and I'm sure it will be at some stage)! If Apple can ram an insane resolution display into the size of a watch which is able to run from a tiny watch battery, then Cannon can clearly do the same so maybe over time we can expect to see the trusty LCD display evolve to the next level!

It's been amazing the technology path that has occurred since circa 2008/9 what with the DSLR film revolution (which Cannon spawned with their HD 5D/7D et al). Now practically every company on the planet has joined the 4k obsession. Regardless their lens range superiority is undeniable (and yummy). Nikons shift to 'Sony' sensors basically traunced Cannon with their D800/D810 due to high pixel count and stunning dynamic range (which has always been lacking from Cannon). Yet now Cannon have their 50 megapixel offering yikes - I love it all; its amazing (and it sounds like you do too) he he! :)

Battery life seems be the bain of all mobile technology, which is why I found the recent Apple release of the new MacBook interesting because if it's ingenious stacked/wafer battery system (which allows them to have a huge pile of cells in a tiny space (very cool indeed)! Naturally they have the patent on this approach, and the financial backing to destroy anyone who encroaches on it, but there's lots of mobile tech that could benefit from this; at least I would hope that the new crop of Apple iPhones/iPads will utilise it for some uber music making power!

My apologies to the NS community anyway as this DSLR talk is like totally off topic [oops] (but it was fun regardless) creative minds/creative interests - uber amazing technology evolution... It's just seriously cool lets face it! ;)

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

"Chrome now seems to be fine on iPad Air with iOS 8.3. Weird. I turn it off after every use, so I know it wasn't an issue of just turn off/turn on.
Looks like I should just try the 8.3 on the iPhone 6+. Scary..."

@Slam-Cut... Go on... you know you want to (he he) ;) Look at it this way, the Sharks that were in the IOS ocean already ate me, so they're neither hungry or conscious now (napping on the ocean floor) so it's a good time to upgrade lol! :)

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

Was there a prize for being the 1500th post on this thread?
No? I thought I read about it somewhere...

Why indeed Monsiour Slam-Cut... You get a special edition gold/mega bling 'skin' for NS2!!! Wow that would be fun if Matt introduced 'skins' for NS2 (like they did back in the day with Propellorheads ReBirth!? Community designs/influenced?

Well at least I'm back on topic - add it to the Wishlist! I'm sure this has already been suggested but I'll be screwed if I'm trudging through said 1500 posts to find out lol ;) ha ha ha...

PS: @Stiksi could utilise his graphics skills to make some bad ass NS2 skins! :)

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

@Slam-Cut, Roland Ghaia = super yummy awesomeness! Regarding the similarity between Sunrizer and Supernova I'd definately say he was influenced by it, the sounds really are very similar (even some of the presets seem emulated) but this doesn't diminish it in any way - I mean I paid like £2.30 for Sunrizer and £299 for my used Supernova! :0 Sunrizer has a slightly course/artefact-ridden sound compared to the purity of the hardware generated Supernova (and naturally it does a lot more with its sophisticated matrix, stack mode, multi FX per channel et al, but dam Sunrizer sounds good - I hope you get it working again (if the Sharks don't wake up) just paddle quietly! ;)

Stiksi
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Joined: 11/21/2010

@ ElectricWombat: "If Apple can ram an insane resolution display into the size of a watch which is able to run from a tiny watch battery, then Cannon can clearly do the same so maybe over time we can expect to see the trusty LCD display evolve to the next level!"

Good point but I guess you haven't heard about the battery regulations in Japan? That's why the newer generation DSLRs actually achieve fewer shots per cycle than the older ones. They were put into effect around the time the D4 and D800 came out if I remember correctly. Sucks bigtime. It would be nice if they at least produced better batteries for abroad but it doesn't seem to be an option.

@Slam-Cut: Oh, but rearranging the channels like that is my dream… maybe some day. In about a year?

Slam-Cut
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Joined: 09/07/2011

I think syrupcore was playing a trick on me. The FX modules can't be re-arranged. You can load others into a given slot, but the settings will not be the same, so you have to make the adjustments all over again. It's bot the end of the world to do that, but it would be cool to keep the settings the same and rearrange to hear the subtle results.

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

Hey @Stiksi, thanks for pointing that out about the changes in Japan, I didn't realise that and it's a real shame that performance has changed accordingly. There's always 3rd party technologies available which subvert things; but I have to admit I'm way too cautious (even with things like a battery grip) to use any rogue kit. Fortunately there are solutions aimed more at filmmakers (external power packs etc) made by reputable companies. However it seems that batteries and mobile power in general is definately an area that will need much R&D as we continue to go ever deeper and deeper down the mobile technology rabbit hole! :)

Slam-Cut
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Upgraded my iPhone 6+ to iOS 8.3. I had to delete and reinstall Chrome, which now works just fine, and the same for SunrizerXS which now only has the default presets. I probably have the 3rd party preset banks for it somewhere on my computer, but I know that the presets I created were not saved. I don't regularly save my presets in other apps, which is bad. I've got a better habit for that with NS, but this does bring me back around to thinking about presets again.

I like the Project bank system and want to keep that (ideally with more than 64 presets), but if when saving a single preset there was also an option to save it to a new root level folder called 'Presets' it would be a nice safety net. Later, in Nanosync, we could gather up all those loose presets into a Project bank. In fact I wish Nanosync would allow us to move presets around, copying some favorites out of Project A and adding them to Project B, without removing them from the original Project A so that any track using the presets would still work. I know I make that sound like it's easy, but I'm sure it's much more tricky than that. I guess presets could only be dropped into Project files in empty preset numbers.
Or some such system.

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

Hey @Slam-Cut, glad that 'Sunrizer XS' is working again properly, yeh preset management is a total nightmare on IOS! I think it would be cool if there was a feature within 'AudioShare' that allowed you to generically store arbitrary presets in your own folders (how cool would that be)! Anyway as far as I know IOS 8.4 should be out in the next few days; I wonder what splendour, horror, enlightenment or intrigue this upgrade will introduce lol... ;)

Slam-Cut
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Joined: 09/07/2011

Great. Just what I need. 8.4

General Question for any of you guys that are into this sort of stuff:
Should we be thinking about high resolution audio? Will that be a thing in a few years that will make all of our current mixdowns seem 'low resolution'? Just curious.
http://www.palmsounds.net/2015/06/iaudiogate-from-korg-arrives-in-uk.htm...

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

@Slam-Cut, thanks for the link as I knew nothing of that particular hard/software technology (although it doesn't surprise me). I'm over opinionated at the best of times (any regular here is nodding); but I have to say I have pretty strong opinions on this subject so I just gotta bite! ;)

I think one of the biggest issues for me (being an audiophile if I have the means) is the low fidelity of much music now in 2015 (and one of the major limitations of IOS currently) with regard to separating it from the desktop and professional world.

For example I refuse to purchase audio from iTunes because it's compressed (and Apples lossless codec ALAC isn't an option currently) why would I want an inferior/damaged copy of a piece of music I love? Many don't care, but for me it's CD (minimum) or nothing; naturally for casual listening it doesn't matter, but a library of damaged audio has little appeal to me.

Sample rate doesn't matter nearly so much as bit rate because at CD quality [44.1 KHz] meaning sampling @ 44,100 times a second) the technology is capable of reproducing all of the frequencies within the human hearing range (20 Hz to 20 KHz). That's why they chose it.

However 16 bit is relatively low-fi and was only chosen for CD technology because back in the 80's/90's available consumer level hardware could cope with it (and it sounds good). However merely listening to CD quality is fine, but producing and processing sound at 16 bits is INFERIOR.

Here's why:

The reason why CD's sound good is that a CD master is the final part of an extremely high resolution process whereby the music has likely previously existed at rates as high as 192 KHz/32 bit float (or double) etc. The resolution is then deliberately down sampled/bit reduced with antialiasing (dithering) to translate as much of that resolution as possible into 16 bit/44.1 KHz.

I think this is why there is a lot of confusion as people think that CD quality is the ultimate benchmark (and is it kinda) provided you understand CD sounds as good as it does because it's existed at a higher resolution then mastered for CD deliberately - this isn't the same as recording at CD quality from the outset (where the previous data is already lost).

But it doesn't take much to improve everything radically, IOS music just needs to jump to 24 bit. For any that don't understand the difference between BITS and SAMPLING FREQUENCY; sampling frequency denotes how often the music is sampled (as above) with higher sampling rates increasing the frequency range that can be captured (above human hearing reducing processing artefacts and distortion). Whereas BITS denote the actual WORD LENGTH (data precision) translating to possible levels of amplitude that can be captured for example.

So with a 16 bit recording there is circa 65,536 levels of possible amplitude that can be encoded, however with 24 bit, there is circa 16,777,216 (big difference). When you record at 16 bits, the noise floor is audible (but low) meaning you have to keep levels high (peaking) to achieve a good SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio).

However, when you record at 24 bit, the the noise floor is obscenely low meaning that it's inaudible and you don't have to peak record to full scale (i.e. touching the red) so you can record at much lower levels, bring them up later and still have no noise! The quality of 24 bit sound is obviously superior (full, smooth, more precise etc) but it's importance in recording is the point I'm trying to make.

The other thing is that a 24 bit recording has so much more information because of the long word length (the precision of the 'sound' is a huge number) and a major problem with mixing/editing is rounding errors. Every time you do anything to a sound (adjust volume, edit it, EQ it etc) the sound is damaged because a closest match is used based on the precision.

The precision of 24 bit is extremely high (65,000 vs. 17 million etc) so the damage is much less significant, this is why the standard project quality is typically 24 bit/44.1 kHz on a desktop machine. This is why there's also a major issue with the current IOS workflow (which belittles it).

I mentioned above the notion of DITHERING which is a process used to capture as much high resolution detail as possible in a final REDUCED master (and is complex so I'll keep it simple) but it basically involves adding random noise to audio before its reduced in quality to prevent artefacts and maintain audio fidelity. However it is only supposed to occur 'once' at the final mastering stage.

Apps always 'upscale' the sound source (usually 32 bit float) to maintain INTERNAL quality for the reasons layed out above. This is then reduced to 16 bit on output (and I assume dithered consequently - though Matt as an insider might be able to shed light on this). Dithering should only be used once (ideally) as every time bit reduction occurs, new dither noise has to be added, so consequently it adds up (at least theoretically if it's utilised) every time you pass sound between apps (AudioBus?)

Based on the above then; music should only be reduced to 16 bits/dithered once at the final mastering stage; yet IOS relies heavily on multiple descrete apps processing audio (at 32 bit floating point INTERNALLY) then outputting it at 16 bit, only to repeat the process multiple times as its passed from one app to another (with dithering). The result is carnage of the original sound in terms of fidelity via quantisation errors etc (despite it sounding OK because you don't get to A/B it).

In the desktop world where 'VST plug-ins' and recordings exist exclusively inside the DAW (and within the high quality session (at excessive bit rates and sample rates) the above is either irrelevant or much less of an issue; but for IOS currently I'd say it's the thorn in its side. Audio Units (AU) Mmm... IOS 9 could be the solution! :p

PS: If you struggle with insomnia and need help falling asleep this post will help ;)

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

One thing I just wanted to add (in case it's not clear and construed negatively) when you are working within a DAW (such as NanoStudio et al) within say a 16 bit/44.1 KHz session, the INTERNAL quality remains high (typically 32 bit floating point) as DAW's increase the 'working resolution' to maintain a high quality signal path (as do most apps). The issue is back/forth etc.

So the point I was trying to make is merely that as the IOS workflow currently relies on having to constantly move sounds from one environment to another (to make use of disparate sound toys) there's a constant need to down sample/up sample/dither to 16 bits - because you have to leave the 'DAW session' rather than simply open a VST instrument etc.

So the current IOS workflow compounds the issue of struggling to maintain a high fidelity audio path by necessity. However, this doesn't mean that making music on IOS sounds bad per-se; it's just one of the prominent issues the platform currently suffers from in its infancy because apps struggle to play together nicely.

If you're working in NanoStudio and simply pulling in a some sounds from synths, some samples that you have mangled etc, the above issues are minimal. You could then export to a mastering app ready for release. It's just that IOS has its limits currently and as such doesn't have the luxury of super fast workstations with exorbitant resolutions and sample rates!

The idea above for being able to pass sounds around at a higher bit rate would certainly help maintain more quality, but if apps could reside within the DAW then it would be less of a concern in the 1st place. Also higher quality audio WILL arrive eventually, it's just evolution, but at the same time... in a world obsessed with downloading compressed audio and bit crushing FX who cares!!! Ha ha ha :p

Slam-Cut
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@ElectricWombat: that sort of stuff is over my head, so thanks for explaining it in normal language. I prefer to buy CDs as well, and I don't really want to have to worry about the science behind apps or VSTs. Like most musicians, I just want it to work and sound great. I think NS is using 24 bit if I remember correctly, and it is just iOS that forces 16 bit on us. Maybe iOS 9 will change that...? I've learned not to bet on Apply making things better or easier for music production. They might, or they might take steps to break things that work. Like SunrizerXS - turns out it doesn't work in 8.3. Well it works right up until I load a sound bank into it. I suspect the 'Open In' process could be the reason and I'll have to figure out another way to load banks. Maybe in iTunes. Got sidetracked...

Well I guess the answer to the question is that NS mixdowns as .wav files sound better than MP3s, but don't count on that being the case if the world suddenly shifts to 24 bit everything. I was burned by the video revolution. Bought an expensive video camera that did 720, about 13 years ago when that was pretty damn good. Didn't know that 1080 would come along a few years later and make my 720 camera look like crap. Great! One day my mixdowns will sound as bad as old VHS tapes played on modern 1080 big screen TVs. And they are already pushing for 4K TVs?

Will we be able to open .nsp files 5 years from now to do a 24 bit mixdown? 10 years? Will NS still work in iOS 15 or 20? Will NS2 be able to open old .nsp files? I have Technology Anxiety.

ElectricWombat
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@Slam-Cut, thanks I'm glad it was of some use, the issue above is something that's plagued me since joining IOS earlier this year. Anyway you raise some really interesting and highly relevant points and I think the fear of how we cope with previous material (audiovisual) is very real and an issue for the industry in general (desktop and not just IOS).

I remember seeing a particular documentary on the issues surrounding this matter regarding the desktop world (with thought to recording music) and the reality is that you can't seriously expect to open anything in the future as the architecture changes so much it's impossible to maintain working sessions.

Further, we increasingly use so many plug-ins now (i.e. the track 'is' the plug-ins such as VSTi's etc). In that sense the 'arrangement' is an important thing to protect (MIDI data/score/samples) as that is the track in its most basic sense. Then exporting high quality individual tracks mixed/finalised (or at least stems) and not just stereo mix-downs (32 bit float/192 KHz ideally). These files will always be high quality but are completely out of most people's reach so you just capture and store in the best way you can (at the highest quality)!

It was a brilliant point about the video camera as it was only like 2008 that HD video (1280p) became the new standard definition. However, now anything less than 4K is off the menu (the company RED is up to 6K+); it just seems crazy how fast technology evolves - and it definitely makes your head spin! :)

ElectricWombat
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@Slam-Cut, I missed your comment of Sunrizer still being screwed earlier but just wanted to mention that I think you could be right about the 'open in' functionality with IOS 8.3 being at fault because AudioShare and the AUFX range has just been updated for that very same reason (from what I understand). Sunrizer seems to work fine for me on the iPhone 4S/IOS 8.3 still (but I've not had to mess with importing banks etc)!

Greendotmatrix
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Joined: 06/18/2015

Haven't seen mention of these but overdrive, time stretch a la ableton and a vocoder would be cool :)

Slam-Cut
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@ElectricWombat: yes, I think your post was useful and very informative. (I'm sounding like recent spam now...). I am still reeling from the knowledge bombing, but when the dust clears I'll see if I can implement something based on that. I suppose I really shouldn't be worried about it now, since I have no fan base and couldn't give away CDs of my music at a busy mall. One day I will get my current album project finished and want to set it loose in the wild. Since I don't come from a technological/engineering background, the science behind it all is something I always feel a bit week on.

The DMT podcast has discussed small 'start up' companies that are offering audiophile streaming, and I wonder if that could be big in a handful of years. Will our CD quality recordings of our music then sound like recording from the early 1900's that sound like the mic was a tin can attached to a string? Are CDs already obsolete and no one cares about anything but disposeable MP3s? (By 'no one' I mean excluding yourself of course) I haven't looked into it, but I would guess that to get on a streaming service like Spotify or Pandora they would want something better than an MP3, at least a wave file. Maybe not. I guess music will always have a bit of a shelf life, and I shouldn't worry about the science behind it too much. I'm probably in more danger pf loosing access to my tracks/sessions due to changes in iOS. If that happens I'll just bust out my tin can & string mics and record to cassette tapes.

I'll let you know how it goes with SunrizerXS. For now at least I have Sunrizer on iPad - yummy!

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

@Slam-Cut, well IOS 8.4 was released yesterday, so as promised I took the plunge and it was very a uninteresting/unremarkable update. Haven't bothered with the new streaming music service yet but it's a bonus that I get a free 3 month trial to play around with it, so that will be cool!

Everything seems to work just the same (had a quick play on Cassini/Animoog in AudioBus). I will let you know if I find anything wierd; but it doesn't really seem like much in the way of a release other than the new music app (which I think is pretty much all it was about).

Regarding high quality streaming music, if only like Apple (et al) would allow users to simply 'choose' between the quality they wish to use (so basically ALAC [FLAC] for full quality then the existing AAC for compressed) then I'd be a lot more open to creating a library.

I have no idea why they don't do this, but even then you never actually own your library per-se; it's merely 'hired' from Apple and tied to their devices (via your Apple ID) and I hate all of those qualities. It's easier just to buy CD's and have as many versions of it as you want that can run on anything for life (and be gifted/given away/exchanged etc).

For a long time I hoped they would release a 24 bit/96 KHz DVD like standard format that would replace the humble CD (and manufactures explored this and similar territories) but the MP3 revolution shifted emphasis towards streaming server based delivery; and essentially I feel this paradigm will forever remain now. I'm good with that; just provided we can 'choose' HQ over inferior compressed 'damaged goods'.

Technically now it should be easier than ever to mass deliver higher quality music (at least CD quality but with the option for audiophile 24 bit/96 KHz too; which ALAC/FLAC can support) because no consumer hardware technology revolution is required; it already exists en-mass. They just need to take their head out of their compressed ass' and get with the program (let's hope) :p

Slam-Cut
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I agree with CD ownership. Been through the vinyl/cassette/CD evolution/wallet grinder and I am happy with CDs. MP3s make sense for streaming, but I agree that higher quality ought to be an option for downloads. Maybe Apple with make that possible one day. They have the financial backing to pull in off. Then they can get everyone who bought MP3s to buy the new 24 bit versions. I don't really care what the masses want to buy, I just don't want to be caught behind the 8 ball on the technology race.

Been thinking about your suggestions. When I'm ready to enter the mixing phase (which I plan to do in Auria), I'll have to record an archival batch of stems for each track, and I think that would include separate recordings of each TRG pad too. I'm just not sure how to record everything that would make it 24 bit 'ready'. I assume that recording onto PC recording software would be the way to go. I wonder if it is possible to get 24 bit out of NS and into desktop DAW? I'll have to reasearch that a bit.

ElectricWombat
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Yeh I kinda hoped that Apple would just 'add' the optional ability to download ALAC [16 bit/44.1 KHz] (uncompressed) versions to users existing libraries as a kind gesture. I mean ALAC is an option when you're ripping music from CD on an iMac etc; so it's really just bringing iTunes up to date (but kindness isn't in Apples vocabulary usually) so I'm unsure about how they'd approach it. I'd certainly anticipate that 24 bit/96 KHz versions (audiophile quality like those available on bandcamp) would likely involve some premium pricing scheme if they chose to support it.

I'm assuming that NanoStudio only exports at 16 bit/44.1 KHz (like 99% of apps on IOS) as via a cursory glance I didn't see any options for bit rate etc. I assume though that Auria is capable of exporting at 24 bit (though I'm just guessing)? It's a difficult (perhaps impossible) thing to explore on IOS currently as its the platform/hardware imposing the limit (not the developers).

What basically happens if you import lower bit rates into a higher bit rate project is that remaining space in the word length is simply filled with zero's (because it can't recreate the lost data). However after you begin editing those zero's are replaced and the lesser files take advantage of higher precision etc. This occurs anyway as internal sound processing is typically 32 bit (or higher).

There's no way to really take advantage of 24 bit processing unless you're running a native 24 bit session in your target DAW in which case all of its advantages are applied right across the spectrum (mic inputs, VST/VSTi outputs etc). The thing is though it's never clear how developers approach internal VST processing (they keep it a secret).

So for example an effect by Waves (EQ etc) might over sample beyond the native frequency to reduce artefacts during processing then down sample at the output stage (like hardware). Some VST's might be working at 16 bit internally regardless of the session.

I wouldn't get too concerned with trying to be 24 bit ready; it's impossible on IOS currently without the intervention of the desktop world (and desktop versions of IOS tools like Sunrizer VST) ideally. If all of your sound sources are predominantly 16 bit/44.1 kHz (IOS feeding a desktop multitrack for example) the 24 bit DAW session is little more than a 'wrapper'.

Naturally if you are taking feeds from IOS at 16 bit/44.1 kHz but then running them through boutique gear into a 24 bit/96 kHz DAW session (the kinda thing those cool kiwi's at Goldbaby do) then that's an entirely different story (very reasonable justification) to capture the hardware nuances/characteristics etc.

The most important thing is to just export your individual tracks and stems (ideally both with and without FX/processing) as then you can essentially remix the original tracks in the future (many choices). The dry versions in this sense become like the 'raw' takes from tracking so that you could use crazy hardware processing (Lexicon et al) or succulent desktop level plugins (Slate digital, Waves etc).

Provided you've got the original tracks, MIDI/samples etc; you can take them into whatever you want and at least you have that peace of mind (future proof)! Just develop the material in a way you know and love (NS he he) and then just collect all the resources and keep them backed up on multiple disks! I'm looking forward to hearing your project anyway! :)

Slam-Cut
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Interestingly a quick check on the web confirmed that Auria does record at 24 bit, but if the source is only 16 bit the other 8 bits are unused. I'm not sure about that, but I am surprised that it isn't just 16 bit. I wonder if the files it creates are unnecessarily large with the extra 8 bits of non-information...
Well, if my iOS apps/hardware are all at 16 bit, then there is no way for me to even create 24 bit tracks even if I hi-jack a recording studio. Looks like I'm stuck in 90's state of the art sonic bliss: CD quality.

Good point on the dry tracks! I'll have to try to remember that.

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

Hey Slam-Cut, I had a feeling it might as its emphasis is on mixing (especially for acoustic sources etc). So the low noise floor is especially beneficial to mic inputs et al. It's important to note that although mixing in a '24 bit session' can't increase the output resolution of your sound sources (say Sunrizer XS), it's still beneficial to do your mixing in the higher bit rate as everything you do beyond importing the sounds originally (when you begin mixing) will be maintained at a higher quality level (and importantly stored as such for HQ archival).

Further, as I mentioned above, the other bits 'are used' because they become populated with data (after import) as soon as you change literally anything. For example [workflow A] if you had a lush analogue channel strip/pre-amp you could run a line input through it (from an IOS source) then record the output into an Auria 24 bit track (capturing the colour/warmth of the conversion).

Alternatively [workflow B] just import into your session; Auria will 'fill' the spare 8 bits with 'zero's'; which will quickly be replaced with data as you apply processing/FX/edits which will benefit from the higher bit rate and you will thus be able to store your projects in a higher resolution - just as you wanted!

The file size will be 'a little bigger' but not a huge amount, in the age of mega storage it will be irrelevant, but you certainly won't want them needlessly hanging around on your iDevice as with Apples tight ass circa $100/£100 per 16 gig policy, you'll eat through space real quick! The intended 24 bit tracks/stems can just be exported after session completion (perhaps just leaving the pre/post masters onboard for mix balancing/comparison and critiquing.

That's cool anyway, it's not quite a full 24 bit signal path; but it's as close as is gets on IOS right now until the platform evolves to the next step but you're doing all you can to capture everything at the highest level (which is all you can ever do)! Slam-Cut sets new personal heights in IOS based sonic yummness! :)

Slam-Cut
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Joined: 09/07/2011

Cool. Thanks for clarifying that. I was wondering if 24 bit recording was superfluous with 16 bit hardware/software, but it now seems wise to use the 24 bit for recording. I was just reading the Auria forum thread anticipating Auria Pro. Lots of frustration and bickering. I certainly understand what it's like waiting for a major new version of an app... Seems like this is time in iOS music production app development where everyone is scrambling to get 'next generation' products built. Reminds me of the era when desktop computers were able to do some cool things but were still a far ways off from 'pro' equipment.

Stiksi
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Joined: 11/21/2010

Apple Music is about as underwhelming as it can get. There's no reasonable way to discover new music, unless you enjoy googling and typing band names into the search field. The curated playlists are filled with hits from the 90's – ok, genre hits, but still – the "For you" tab that's supposed to be the response to Spotify's "Discover" is completely useless. It basically just shows me what I already have in my library. The radio is, uh, a radio, nothing special there, iTunes has had tons of better ones when you could still listen to actual web radio stations.

Once again Apple tries to solve infinite variety by disregarding it completely and forcing you into their opinion. I hate Spotify, but at least it was useful.

ElectricWombat
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Joined: 01/16/2015

@Stiki, thanks for sharing your initial experiences regarding the 'new' music app, I have to say I still haven't started my free trial yet. With Apples obsession with restriction and control the issues you've discussed above sound about right, but there's always the optimism something new might be totally awesome first time! I'll bite at some stage I'm sure and introduce myself around/see what they've been up to etc; but it was good to hear some initial opinion as I have to admit I instantly forgot all about it after the update lol :)